Community Wellbeing

Our Community Wellbeing program aims to alleviate disadvantage and promote the general wellbeing of the community. Community Wellbeing grants seek to encourage organisations to participate in innovative activities or programs which enhance the wellbeing of the community, or which alleviate homelessness or other disadvantage arising from poverty or other causes.

The Bread and Butter Project

Overview

The Foundation’s first Community Wellbeing grant was made in 1964 to the Victorian Society for Crippled Children and Adults for $1,000. Since then the program has distributed over 3,300 grants to projects around Australia valued at over $30 million.

Now the Foundation’s busiest and most diverse program area - addressing issues ranging from homelessness to crisis support – the greatest challenge is identifying those projects that are likely to have the greatest impact on some of society’s most complex issues.

Our grants may also support pilot programs designed to help community organisations to better understand problems – especially new problems that are arising in this era of rapid change - and to develop effective solutions.

An excellent example of the latter is provided by Brophy Family & Youth Services’ Reality & Risk project which tackles the impact of increasingly pervasive mainstream pornography on young people by increasing knowledge of the issues and developing relevant and targeted strategies and resources to address them. The Foundation provided two grants to Brophy in 2011: the first $50,000 to develop the research and materials, followed by $20,000 to assist rollout of the resources to schools, agencies and the media.

The stated objective of the Community Wellbeing area is to help alleviate disadvantage and promote the general wellbeing of the community. Prevention of homelessness is a major focus of the large grants stream, in particular early intervention programs that aim to derail the cycle of disadvantage that can lead to homelessness.

This area also makes grants in the name of The Alec Prentice Sewell Gift.

Funding Objectives

We support successful organisations with proven track records, and blend this with investments in well-considered innovations and ideas, such as social enterprises, that provide new and sustainable ways of tackling entrenched problems. The Foundation particularly encourages applications that have a strong volunteer component.

The Community Wellbeing program currently operates two streams of funding:

  • General grants ($50,000-$100,000): emphasis on innovative programs that work to alleviate disadvantage and promote the general well-being of the community
  • Large grants (more than $100,000): prevention of homelessness, in particular early intervention programs that aim to break the cycle of disadvantage that can lead to homelessness. 

Applicants are required to speak with a Program Manager if submitting an Expression of Interest (EOI) for a grant of more than $100,000.

Proposals for multi-year projects are encouraged for large grants, but please note that for general grants the total maximum grant is $100,000, regardless of the project duration.

The Ian Potter Foundation rarely awards the full amount of any project.  Please ensure that you have alternative providers of funding, and that your application clearly considers any possible grant  from the Foundation in this context.  We are unlikely to fund 100% of a project cost.

This program area also makes grants on behalf of The Alec Prentice Sewell Gift, a bequest that was made to the Foundation in 2003.

Please also refer to the Funding Principles section for further guidance.

Eligibility

The Ian Potter Foundation can only make grants to organisations with BOTH Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR) Item 1 and Tax Concession Charity (TCC) status.

Under the terms of the deed of The Ian Potter Foundation and Australian taxation laws, The Ian Potter Foundation can only make grants to organisations with BOTH Deductible Gift Recipient (DGR) Item 1 and Tax Concession Charity (TCC) status.

Please make sure you read the funding objectives and specific exclusions for the Community Wellbeing program area (below) before applying.

Exclusions

The Community Wellbeing program area does not support:
• Core business
• Ongoing or recurrent programs (ie. programs that have already been implemented or ongoing programs delivered in a different location)
• Production of DVDs or promotional material
• Camps
• The purchase and maintenance of vehicles
• Capital grants for the construction or refurbishment of buildings
• Academic research projects not linked to service delivery programs

General Exclusions

Projects that fall into any of the following categories will not be considered for funding:
• Recurrent expenditure for which there is no future provision.
• Capital or endowment funds established to provide a corpus for institutions.
• Research for undergraduate, masters or doctoral students.
• Auspicing* is not permitted – the organisation applying must be the one that will run the program or project.
• Applications for public charitable purposes outside the Commonwealth of Australia**.
• Applications for projects that have previously been declined by the Foundation cannot be resubmitted.
• Applications will not be accepted from organisations that have not successfully acquitted previous grants from the Foundation
• We do not directly support schools

*Auspicing
Auspicing refers to the practice of an ineligible organisation (one that does not have DGR and TCC status) applying to the Foundation via an eligible organisation. Auspicing arrangements are excluded under the Foundation's guidelines. The organisation applying to the Foundation must be the organisation that will run the project or program for which a grant is being sought.


** Geographical constraints on grants
The Foundation is limited to providing money, property or benefits for public charitable purposes in the Commonwealth of Australia. However, the Foundation is able to provide a grant for activities outside the Commonwealth if the grant is made for a public charitable purpose in the Commonwealth. For example, a grant might be made to an Australian university to enable it to fund an overseas study tour by an Australian researcher engaged by the university.

Outcomes & Metrics

It is the aim of the Foundation that the projects that it funds will have impact beyond immediate key performance indicators and outputs. In your Community Wellbeing application, you will be asked to select between two and five long-term goals. 

Long-term outcomes might be:

  • Improved financial sustainability
  • Improved health and wellbeing
  • Promotion/dissemination of best practice/new knowledge
  • Improved operational capacity/capability
  • Increased knowledge base
  • Improved skill base
  • Improved service delivery/quality
  • Improved service system/sector collaboration
  • Reduced/prevented alcohol/drug use
  • Improved access to education/training/employment
  • Improved housing stock availability/affordability
  • Increase community capacity/engagement
  • Increased financial security/economic participation
  • Reduced/prevented family/workplace violence
  • Reduced/prevented incarcerations
  • Increased social participation
  • Prevention of homelessness
  • Increase transitions out of homelessness

In your final report, you will be asked how you progressed on your long-term outcomes. It’s helpful to select your metrics early on, so you can begin to collect information about your success as soon as your project begins. Some suggested metrics can be found in our Community Wellbeing Outcomes and Metrics guide.

Application Process

Ready to begin?

Grant requests for Community Wellbeing are considered via a two-step Expression of Interest process. You can preview the EOI  information you will be required to submit.

To improve your chance of success, check out : Tips &Hints, FAQs, Grants Database

Application Process

The online application can only be accessed when a funding round is open.

Step 1: Read ALL the information on this program area page to ensure you meet the eligibility criteria and program area objectives before you begin.

Step 2: Select 'Apply for a Grant' tab below. This tab will only appear when applications are open.

Step 3: You will then need to login by entering your username and password or create an account by clicking New Applicant?.

Step 4: Complete the Eligibility Quiz. If you meet eligibility requirements, you will proceed to the Expression of Interest online form.

After you save and close you can re-access your Expression of Interest via the My Account Icon minilink using your username and password. 

Step 5: If your Expression of Interest is approved by the Program Manager, you will be invited to submit a full application.

Step 6: Complete your application (Stage 2). Ensure your application is submitted by 5pm EST on the closing date.

We require a hard copy including all supporting documents as well as the online application. Both must be received by the 5pm EST deadline on the closing date. Applications may be sent by courier or hand-delivered. Applications postmarked with the closing date will not be accepted.

We require a hard copy including all supporting documents as well as the online application. Both must be received by the 5.00pm EST deadline on the closing date.  Applications may be sent by courier or hand-delivered. Applications postmarked with the closing date will not be accepted.

What happens next?

All grant applications are considered by the Board of Governors at the Foundation’s board meetings, which are held three times a year in April, August & December.

You will be advised of the outcome of your application by phone or email.

Apply for a Grant

Next Funding Round

Upcoming

Round 2, 2017

Applications open 27 March 2017

Community Wellbeing grants seek to encourage organisations to participate in innovative activities or programs which enhance the wellbeing of the community, or which alleviate homelessness or other disadvantage arising from poverty or other causes.

Expression of Interest

Open: Monday 27 March 2017
Close: Friday 21 April 2017

Feature Case Studies

  • Future for Families

    The YWCA NSW Future For Families education and life-skills training program addresses the long-term needs of young homeless families. 

    Organisation: 
    YWCA NSW
    Project: 
    Future for Families
    Dates: 
    July 2010 - July 2012
    Grant: 
    $160,000
    www.ywcansw.com.au

    Read more

    ‘Families can fall victim to homelessness through a number of factors such as having to flee a violent relationship; poor budgeting skills and falling behind with rent payments, or other personal barriers like mental health issues or drug dependency.’

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